#365papers November Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

This reading a paper a day is so difficult when there are a million and one things going on and a thesis to write! I think it’s safe to say that I won’t be doing the #365papers challenge in 2018, but I’m determined to complete this year’s challenge. I’ve enjoyed this month’s reading, but I’ve been doing it in little bursts – meaning I’ve only just finished November’s reading list as this blog post goes live at the beginning of December.. Next month’s reading has to be finished on time because there’s no way I’m panic reading piles of papers on new year’s eve – I’m committed to finishing this thing on a high!

November’s reading:

  1. Research Involvement and Engagement: reflections so far and future directions
  2. The impact of involvement on researchers: a learning experience
  3. Power to the people: To what extent has public involvement in applied health research achieved this?
  4. Factors associated with reporting results for pulmonary clinical trials in ClinicalTrials.gov
  5. A systematic review and development of a classification framework for factors associated with missing patient-reported outcome data
  6. The treatment in morning versus evening (TIME) study: analysis of recruitment, follow-up and retention rates post recruitment
  7. Can routine data be used to support cancer clinical trials? A historical baseline on which to build: retrospective linkage of data from the TACT breast cancer trial and the National Cancer Data Repository
  8. Network methods to support user involvement in qualitative data analyses: an introduction to Participatory Theme Elicitation
  9. A systematic literature review of evidence-based clinical practice for rare diseases: what are the perceived and real barriers for improving the evidence and how can they be overcome?
  10. Improving readiness for recruitment through simulated trial activation: the Adjuvant Steroids in Adults with Pandemic influenza (ASAP) trial
  11. The marketing plan and outcome indicators for recruiting and retaining parents in the HomeStyles randomised controlled trial
  12. Advancing ‘real-world’ trials that take account of social context and human volition
  13. Impact of a deferred recruitment model in a randomised controlled trial in primary care (CREAM) study
  14. Framing the conversation: use of PRECIS-2 ratings to advance understanding of pragmatic trial design domains
  15. Lessons from the field: the conduct of randomised controlled trials in Botswana
  16. Participant recruitment and retention in longitudinal preconception randomised trials: lessons learnt from the Calcium and Pre-eclampsia (CAP) trial
  17. A framework for the design, conduct and interpretation of randomised controlled trials in the presence of treatment changes
  18. Peak Gender Gap: Women at the top of science agencies
  19. Survey of risks and benefits communication strategies by research nurses
  20. The fractured logic of blinded peer review in journals
  21. Choosing wisely: How to fulfil the promise in the next 5 years
  22. Catch-22, clinical trial edition: Protecting women and children
  23. Insufficient recruitment and premature discontinuation of clinical trials in Switzerland: qualitative study with trialists and other stakeholders
  24. Rebranding retractions and the honest error hypothesis
  25. Participation and retention can be high in randomised controlled trials targeting underserved populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis
  26. Rheumatoid arthritis patients treated in trial and real world settings: comparison of randomised trials with registries
  27. Prevalence, characteristics, and publication of discontinued randomised trials
  28. Clear obstacles and hidden challenges: understanding recruiter perspectives in six pragmatic randomised controlled trials
  29. The intellectual challenges and emotional consequences of equipoise contributed to the fragility of recruitment in six randomised controlled trials
  30. Patient enrollment and logistical problems top the list of difficulties in clinical research: a cross-sectional survey

#365papers October Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

Last month’s #365papers update was late.. again. This month though, I’m perfectly on time! I’ve caught up on reading thanks to a burst of motivation, reading for a writing retreat I’ve booked on to for the beginning of December, and reading for potential fellowship applications over the next few months. I’ve enjoyed this month’s reading more than previous months – I think it’s because I gave myself a bit more freedom to read papers that weren’t clearly and obviously linked to my PhD work, and allowed myself a bit more exploration within the subject of recruitment.

October’s reading:

  1. Writing retreat as structured intervention: margin or mainstream?
  2. ‘It’s not a hobby’: reconceptualising the place of writing in academic work
  3. Time is not enough: promoting strategic engagement with writing for publication
  4. Increasing academic output and supporting equality of career opportunity in universities: can writers’ retreats play a role?
  5. Developing a community of research practice
  6. An integrated conceptual framework for evaluating and improving ‘understanding’ in informed consent
  7. Specific barriers to the conduct of randomised clinical trials on medical devices
  8. The necessity of randomised clinical trials
  9. When are randomised trials unnecessary? Picking signal from noise
  10. The James Lind Library: explaining and illustrating the evolution of fair tests of medical treatments
  11. What is the best evidence for determining harms of medical treatment?
  12. Comparison of evidence of treatment effects in randomised and nonrandomised studies
  13. Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn’t
  14. The crisis in recruitment for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s and dementia: An action plan for solutions
  15. Alzheimer’s disease therapeutic trials: EU/US task force report on recruitment, retention, and methodology
  16. Participation in dementia trials and studies: Challenges and recommendations (whitepaper)
  17. Dementia trials and dementia tribulations: methodological and analytical challenges in dementia research
  18. Obstacle and opportunities in Alzheimer’s clinical trial recruitment
  19. Recruitment of subjects into clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease
  20. Commentary on “A roadmap for the prevention of dementia II. Leon Thal Symposium 2008.” Recruitment of participants for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials: The role of trust in caregivers, clinical researchers, regulatory authorities, and industry sponsors
  21. Recruitment rates in gerontological research: the situation for drug trials in dementia may be worse than previously reported
  22. How redesigning AD clinical trials might increase study partners’ willingness to participate
  23. Number of Alzheimer’s clinical trials almost doubles in 3 years
  24. Comparison of recruitment efforts targeted at primary care physicians versus the community at large for participation in Alzheimer’s Disease clinical trials
  25. Addressing the challenges to successful recruitment and retention in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials
  26. Are biomarkers harmful to recruitment and retention in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials? An international perspective
  27. Recruiting community-based dementia patients and caregivers in a nonpharmacologic randomised trial: What works and how much does it cost?
  28. Attitudes toward clinical trials across the Alzheimer’s disease spectrum
  29. Why has therapy development for dementia failed in the last two decades?
  30. Predictors of physician referral for patient recruitment to Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials
  31. Recruiting to preclinical Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials through registries

#365papers September Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

I ended last month’s #365papers update by saying ‘hopefully September’s reading won’t be quite so late as August’s was…’ – and here I am 13 days late. September was a really busy month and though I was reading, it was snippets and abstracts and posters from conferences, rather than entire papers. I’ve now caught up – and I’m determined to make sure that October’s update is back on track time-wise!

This month’s reading has been a big mix of things because I’m working on my literature review, and also getting involved with some new projects. I’ve really enjoyed this month’s reading – when I had time to do it at least, so hopefully there’s some interesting papers in this list for others too.

September’s reading:

  1. The ethics of underpowered clinical trials
  2. The ethics of underpowered clinical trials
  3. Informing clinical trial participants about study results
  4. Women’s views and experiences of two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: A qualitative study
  5. Recruiting patients as partners in health research: a qualitative descriptive study
  6. Identifying additional studies for a systematic review of retention strategies in randomised controlled trials: making contact with trials units and trial methodologists
  7. Methods for obtaining unpublished data
  8. Clinical features of Parkinson’s disease patients are associated with therapeutic misconception and willingness to participate in clinical trials
  9. Health research participants are not receiving research results: a collaborative solution is needed
  10. Health research participants’ preferences for receiving research results
  11. Why is therapeutic misconception so prevalent?
  12. Recommendations for the return of research results to study participants and guardians: a report from the children’s oncology group
  13. Oncology physician and nurse practices and attitudes regarding offering clinical trial results to study participants
  14. Search for unpublished data by systematic reviewers: an audit
  15. Patient and public involvement in data collection for health services research: a descriptive study
  16. Health researchers’ attitudes towards public involvement in health research
  17. Patients’ and clinicians’ research priorities
  18. Public involvement at the design stage of primary health research: a narrative review of case examples
  19. The impact of patient and public involvement on UK NHS health care: a systematic review
  20. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials
  21. No longer research about us without us: a researcher’s reflection on rights and inclusive research in Ireland
  22. Willingness to participate in pragmatic dialysis trials: the importance of physician decisional autonomy and consent approach
  23. How important is patient recruitment in performing clinical trials?
  24. Recruiting hard-to-reach subjects: is it worth the effort?
  25. Fundamental dilemmas of the randomised clinical trial process: results of a survey of the 1,737 Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group investigators
  26. The research-treatment distinction: A problematic approach for determining which activities should have ethical oversight
  27. Leaving therapy to chance
  28. Use of altered informed consent in pragmatic clinical research
  29. A framework for analysis of research risks and benefits to participants in standard of care pragmatic clinical trials
  30. Public engagement on global health challenges

#365papers August Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

July’s post for #365papers was too cocky – I finished July ahead of schedule and then skipped off on holiday. August’s reading was not so good. It’s currently Saturday 9th September and I have only just caught up with August’s reading, so still a bit of catching up to do from the start of September!

This month when I did get round to reading I was concentrating on qualitative studies; I was doing my own qualitative analysis through August and it’s nice to get an idea how different people write and look at their own studies. I also managed to have a really good look at the literature on user-testing and think aloud protocols. On September 10th I’ve off to Cape Town for research trip – I’ll be going to the Global Evidence Summit (blog post(s) to follow for more info!), and then I’m staying in Cape Town to meet with clinical trialists based with the South African Medical Research Council. These trialists will be user-testing evidence-presentation formats – this work makes up part of my PhD project so i’ll do a more in-depth blog post another time. Anyway, hopefully September’s reading won’t be quite so late as August’s was…

August’s reading:

  1. Supporting positive experiences and sustained participation in clinical trials: looking beyond information provision
  2. How many interviews are enough? An experiment with data saturation and variability
  3. Barriers to the conduct of randomised clinical trials within all disease areas
  4. ‘We knew it was a totally at random thing’: parents’ experiences of being part of a neonatal trial
  5. What are funders doing to minimise waste in research?
  6. J Guy Scadding and the move from alternation to randomisation
  7. UK publicly funded Clinical Trials Units supported a controlled access approach to share individual participant data but highlighted concerns
  8. Why do we need evidence-based methods in Cochrane?
  9. Receiving a summary of the results of a trial: qualitative study of participants’ views
  10. The rights of patients in research
  11. Using routinely recorded data in the UK to assess outcomes in a randomised controlled trial: The Trials of Access
  12. The impact of active stakeholder involvement on recruitment, retention and engagement of schools, children and their families in the cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP): a school-based intervention to prevent obesity
  13. Evaluating the efficiency of targeted designs for randomised clinical trials
  14. Improving clinical trial efficiency: thinking outside the box
  15. Stratified randomisation for clinical trials
  16. Factors associated with online media attention to research: a cohort study of articles evaluating cancer treatments
  17. Feasibility of a randomised single-blind crossover trial to assess the effects of the second-generation slow-release dopamine agonists pramipexole and ropinirole on cued recall memory in idiopathic mild or moderate Parkinson’s disease without cognitive impairment
  18. Improving the process of research ethics review
  19. Retrospectively registered trials: The Editors’ dilemma
  20. Cancer Research UK: Taking a broad view of research impact
  21. Getting access to what goes on in people’s heads?: reflections on the think-aloud technique
  22. A description of think aloud method and protocol analysis
  23. How to study thinking in everyday life: Contrasting think-aloud protocols with descriptions and explanations of thinking
  24. Think-aloud technique and protocol analysis in clinical decision-making research
  25. The use of think-aloud methods in qualitative research, an introduction to think-aloud methods
  26. User-centred design
  27. Interpreting the evidence: choosing between randomised and non-randomised studies
  28. The use and abuse of multiple outcomes in randomised controlled depression trials
  29. The unpredictability paradox: review of empirical comparisons of randomised and non-randomised clinical trials
  30. Are randomized clinical trials good for us (in the short term)? Evidence for a “trial effect”
  31. The ethics of underpowered clinical trials (Reply – Janosky)

#365papers July Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

For the first time in a few months, I’m finishing July ahead of schedule! I’m currently writing this before I go on holiday (July 28th) and it’s been scheduled and published whilst I’m enjoying myself with friends in Wroclaw or Krakow, depending on when you’re reading this.

This month I’ve really focussed on getting abstracts screened for my literature review. I still have a big pile waiting for me when I get back to the office, but it feels good to have made at least a little dent in the workload, and the task definitely made reading much easier to fit in too.

July’s reading:

  1. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study
  2. Practical issues regarding implementing a randomized clinical trial in a homeless population: strategies and lessons learned
  3. Avoidable waste related to inadequate methods and incomplete reporting of interventions: a systematic review of randomised trials performed in Sub-Saharan Africa
  4. External validity of randomised controlled trials: “To whom do the results of this trial apply?”
  5. Implementing research findings in developing countries
  6. Spending on public health cut as councils look to save money
  7. New law will force hospitals to charge foreign patients for non-urgent care
  8. Participation in a clinical trial: The patients’ point of view
  9. Clinical trial participation: Viewpoints from racial/ethnic groups
  10. Barriers to clinical trial participation as perceived by oncologists and patients
  11. Determinants of patient participation in clinical studies requiring informed consent: why patients enter a clinical trial
  12. Patient income level and cancer clinical trial participation
  13. Why African Americans may not be participating in clinical trials
  14. Why patients don’t take part in cancer clinical trials: an overview of the literature
  15. Resource implications of preparing individual participant data from a clinical trial to share with external researchers
  16. Short-term impact of celebrating the international clinical trial day: experience from Ethiopia
  17. How to design efficient cluster randomised trials
  18. Six pairs of things to celebrate on International Clinical Trials Day
  19. Development in the number of clinical trial applications in Western Europe from 2007 to 2015: retrospective study of data from national competent authorities
  20. When scientists turn to the public: alternative routes in science communication
  21. Blockchain technology for improving clinical research quality
  22. Barriers to clinical trial recruitment and possible solutions: a stakeholder survey
  23. Unsuccessful trial accrual and human subjects’ protections: an empirical analysis of recently closed trials
  24. Routine data from hospital information systems can support patient recruitment for clinical studies
  25. Impact of participant and physician intervention preferences on randomised trials – a systematic review
  26. Motivators of enrolment in HIV vaccine trials: a review of HIV vaccine preparedness studies
  27. Informed consent documents do not encourage good-quality decision making
  28. The effects of an open design on trial participant recruitment, compliance and retention – a randomized controlled trial comparison with a blinded, placebo-controlled design
  29. Provider roles in the recruitment of underrepresented populations to cancer clinical trials
  30. Recruiting subjects for acute stroke trials: a meta-analysis
  31. Minimisation: a new method of assigning patients to treatment and control groups

#365papers June Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

This month’s reading has not been great – in order to get the 30 papers for June read to the level I wanted to, I ended up dedicating a few days at the end of the month to get them all complete. This month has been a busy one; I went to Evidence Live for 2 days (blog posts here for day 1 and day 2), and this month seems to have been really heavy with meetings. July is looking a bit quieter so fingers crossed I won’t end up cramming at the end of next month too!

June’s reading:

  1. Can we rely on the best trial? A comparison of individual trials and systematic reviews
  2. Science in the social media age
  3. Communicating data about the benefits and harms of treatment: A randomised trial
  4. Tweeting and rule breaking at conferences
  5. Evolution of poor reporting and inadequate methods over time in 20,920 randomised controlled trials included in Cochrane reviews: research on research study
  6. How scientists engage the public
  7. Influence of social media on the dissemination of a traditional surgical research article
  8. Recruiting adolescent research participants: in-person compared to social media approaches
  9. How are scientists using social media in the workplace?
  10. Through the looking glass: understanding non-inferiority
  11. The need for consensus, consistency, and core outcome sets in perioperative research
  12. Bias due to changes in specified outcomes during the systematic review process
  13. Confidence intervals illuminate absence of evidence
  14. Research funders pledge to make trial results publicly available
  15. US to impose tougher rules on reporting clinical trial data
  16. A methodological approach for assessing the uptake of core outcome sets using clinicaltrials.gov: findings from a review of randomised controlled trials of rheumatoid arthritis
  17. Anonymising and sharing individual patient data
  18. How to translate clinical trial results into gain in healthy life expectancy for individual patients
  19. Sparse data bias: a problem hiding in plain sight
  20. Exploring patients’ treatment journeys following randomisation in mental health trials to improve future trial conduct: a synthesis of multiple qualitative data sets
  21. What do usability evaluators do in practice? An explorative study of think-aloud testing
  22. Getting access to what goes on in people’s heads? Reflection on the think-aloud technique
  23. Think-aloud protocols: a comparison of three think-aloud protocols for use in testing data-dissemination web sites for usability
  24. Evidence based medicine manifesto for better healthcare
  25. Thinking aloud: Reconciling theory and practice
  26. Barriers to participation in randomised controlled trials: a systematic review
  27. Clinical trials: the challenge of recruitment and retention of participants
  28. Increasing recruitment to randomised trials: a review of randomised controlled trials
  29. Principles of recruitment and retention in clinical trials
  30. Engaging veterans with substance abuse disorders into a research trial: success with study branding, networking, and presence

#365papers May Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

This month’s reading has been pretty rubbish if I’m honest. I’ve been spending my spare time reading books with plots and characters instead of p values and methods, and whilst in PhD mode I’ve been working on writing up the systematic review chapter of my thesis. Last month I was all motivated and excited to write my literature review – that took a total back seat, and I suspect it will remain there for the next few weeks whilst I finish up a first draft of that thesis chapter. I’m super excited to get this chapter written – I think it’ll calm me down a bit when it comes to writing the thesis as a whole; it feels like a head-start, and mentally, I think that’s a good move. Anyway, I managed to get through May’s reading, but that did involve a pretty heft few days of reading towards the end to catch up.

May’s reading:

  1. The impact of advertising patient and public involvement on trial recruitment: embedded cluster randomised recruitment trial
  2. Novel participatory methods of involving patients in research: naming and branding a longitudinal cohort study, BRIGHTLIGHT
  3. Developing the SELF study: a focus group with patients and the public
  4. What can we learn from trial decliners about improving recruitment? Qualitative study
  5. Overcoming barrier to recruiting ethnic minorities to mental health research: a typology of recruitment strategies
  6. Systematic techniques for assisting recruitment to trials (START): developing the science of recruitment
  7. Testing the effectiveness of user-tested patient information on recruitment rates across multiple trials: meta-analysis of data from the START programme
  8. Challenges to evaluating complex interventions: a content analysis of published papers
  9. An optimised patient information sheet did not significantly increase recruitment or retention in a falls prevention study: an embedded randomised recruitment trial
  10. Sharing individual level data from observational studies and clinical trials: a perspective from NHLBI
  11. Data sharing: not as simple as it seems
  12. Protecting patient privacy when sharing patient-level data from clinical trials
  13. Predictors of clinical trial data sharing: exploratory analysis of a cross-sectional survey
  14. Opening clinical trial data: are the voluntary data-sharing portals enough?
  15. Subversion of allocation concealment in randomised controlled trial: a historical case study
  16. Making a decision about trial participation: the feasibility of measuring deliberation during the informed consent process for clinical trials
  17. Participants’ preference for type of leaflet used to feed back the results of a randomised trial: a survey
  18. Trialists should tell participants results, but how?
  19. HELP! Problems in executing a pragmatic, randomised, stepped wedge trial on the Hospital Elder Life Program to prevent delirium in older patients
  20. Clinician engagement is critical to public engagement with clinical trials
  21. Patient engagement in research: a systematic review
  22. Health researchers’ attitudes towards public involvement in health research
  23. Open clinical trial data for all? A view from regulators
  24. Patient and public involvement: what next for the NHS?
  25. ‘Ordinary people only’: knowledge, representativeness, and the publics of public participation in healthcare
  26. Reflections on health care consumerism: insights from feminism
  27. Publishing information about ongoing clinical trials for patients
  28. Effectiveness of strategies for information, educating and involving patients
  29. Patient involvement in patient safety: what factors influence patient participation and engagement?
  30. Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media: the ‘Get Randomised’ campaign
  31. Communicating the results of clinical research to participants: attitudes, practices, and future directions