Thesis Writing Full Time #2: Creating Structure

I’ve now been thesis writing pretty much full time for about 7 weeks. I’ve still been dipping in and out of work for other projects, leading the organisation of a new local branch of Soapbox Science (our speakers have just been announced – see the brilliant lineup we’ve secured for Aberdeen here!), designing new products for Science On A Postcard, and flitting about at Buckingham Palace.. so it’s not all been thesis-based. Anyway, I feel like I’ve finally got into a routine so thought I’d share that – hopefully it’ll be useful for those of you also writing up and struggling to find your groove.

I said in my last ‘thesis writing full time’ post, that the most productive times for me were between 3 and 6pm, and after dinner until I go to bed. As it turns out, that estimation was wildly wrong, and I just happened to be most productive during those times because I forced myself to focus during those times (that said, I am writing this blog post at ten past 9 on a Wednesday night, so many the night owl thing has some truth to it..). I’ve now found a much better routine, and it involves just getting on with work no matter what time it is. Sounds simple, right? Wrong. This structure thing takes time and dedication, and it’s actually quite difficult to force yourself out of bed an hour earlier just because you ‘should’.
I went on my first writing retreat last December and thought it was brilliant, so brilliant that my parents gifted me another one for Christmas, but it was the second one that I went on (March), that really forced the need to create structure into my brain.

As I said in a blog post about that first writing retreat, Rowena Murray’s retreats rely on a set structure made up of writing blocks, non-negotiable break times, and a distinct lack of distractions (the health app on my iPhone genuinely thought I’d been asleep for 3 days because my phone hadn’t moved from my bag during the entire retreat). During my first retreat I thought I’d got a lot done, but knowing what was ahead of me meant that I prepared much more effectively for the second, and I finished a thesis chapter a week in advance of the deadline (I know, shocking!).

This writing retreat structure is brilliant, it forces productivity, and in the words of Rowena herself, it forces ‘self-efficacy’. So, how have I managed to translate this seemingly magical structure into real life? I’ve been using the Forest App to force myself to focus (I see the irony of needing an app to reduce my ability to be distracted by technology, but it works for me), and I’ve been blocking out writing slots (an hour or an hour and a half depending on how much I want to achieve), and then.. just getting on with it. That’s been great, but it’s easy to find something to creep in and take that time away from me.

Enter, the wonderful Lucy Hinnie. I met Lucy at the March writing retreat where we bonded over a shared love of the fact that Rowena Murray was actually making us more productive, baked goods at break times, and RuPaul’s Drag Race (do not judge us, that show is a cultural masterpiece and I will hear nothing against Mama Ru).
Anyway, she’s continued to be fabulous from afar, and today she ran the first #remoteretreat via Twitter. This took the same structure as Rowena’s retreats, and judging by the response online, it was bloody brilliant. I didn’t manage to make this one, but Lucy is forcing our productivity again next Wednesday (28th March), so I wanted to draw attention to it.
I’ll be joining next week’s #remoteretreat but will need to skip out for an afternoon meeting – join us at 9.15am (GMT) to set goals, and then get writing!

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