#365papers October Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

Last month’s #365papers update was late.. again. This month though, I’m perfectly on time! I’ve caught up on reading thanks to a burst of motivation, reading for a writing retreat I’ve booked on to for the beginning of December, and reading for potential fellowship applications over the next few months. I’ve enjoyed this month’s reading more than previous months – I think it’s because I gave myself a bit more freedom to read papers that weren’t clearly and obviously linked to my PhD work, and allowed myself a bit more exploration within the subject of recruitment.

October’s reading:

  1. Writing retreat as structured intervention: margin or mainstream?
  2. ‘It’s not a hobby’: reconceptualising the place of writing in academic work
  3. Time is not enough: promoting strategic engagement with writing for publication
  4. Increasing academic output and supporting equality of career opportunity in universities: can writers’ retreats play a role?
  5. Developing a community of research practice
  6. An integrated conceptual framework for evaluating and improving ‘understanding’ in informed consent
  7. Specific barriers to the conduct of randomised clinical trials on medical devices
  8. The necessity of randomised clinical trials
  9. When are randomised trials unnecessary? Picking signal from noise
  10. The James Lind Library: explaining and illustrating the evolution of fair tests of medical treatments
  11. What is the best evidence for determining harms of medical treatment?
  12. Comparison of evidence of treatment effects in randomised and nonrandomised studies
  13. Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn’t
  14. The crisis in recruitment for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s and dementia: An action plan for solutions
  15. Alzheimer’s disease therapeutic trials: EU/US task force report on recruitment, retention, and methodology
  16. Participation in dementia trials and studies: Challenges and recommendations (whitepaper)
  17. Dementia trials and dementia tribulations: methodological and analytical challenges in dementia research
  18. Obstacle and opportunities in Alzheimer’s clinical trial recruitment
  19. Recruitment of subjects into clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease
  20. Commentary on “A roadmap for the prevention of dementia II. Leon Thal Symposium 2008.” Recruitment of participants for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials: The role of trust in caregivers, clinical researchers, regulatory authorities, and industry sponsors
  21. Recruitment rates in gerontological research: the situation for drug trials in dementia may be worse than previously reported
  22. How redesigning AD clinical trials might increase study partners’ willingness to participate
  23. Number of Alzheimer’s clinical trials almost doubles in 3 years
  24. Comparison of recruitment efforts targeted at primary care physicians versus the community at large for participation in Alzheimer’s Disease clinical trials
  25. Addressing the challenges to successful recruitment and retention in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials
  26. Are biomarkers harmful to recruitment and retention in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials? An international perspective
  27. Recruiting community-based dementia patients and caregivers in a nonpharmacologic randomised trial: What works and how much does it cost?
  28. Attitudes toward clinical trials across the Alzheimer’s disease spectrum
  29. Why has therapy development for dementia failed in the last two decades?
  30. Predictors of physician referral for patient recruitment to Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials
  31. Recruiting to preclinical Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials through registries
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.