#365papers September Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

I ended last month’s #365papers update by saying ‘hopefully September’s reading won’t be quite so late as August’s was…’ – and here I am 13 days late. September was a really busy month and though I was reading, it was snippets and abstracts and posters from conferences, rather than entire papers. I’ve now caught up – and I’m determined to make sure that October’s update is back on track time-wise!

This month’s reading has been a big mix of things because I’m working on my literature review, and also getting involved with some new projects. I’ve really enjoyed this month’s reading – when I had time to do it at least, so hopefully there’s some interesting papers in this list for others too.

September’s reading:

  1. The ethics of underpowered clinical trials
  2. The ethics of underpowered clinical trials
  3. Informing clinical trial participants about study results
  4. Women’s views and experiences of two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: A qualitative study
  5. Recruiting patients as partners in health research: a qualitative descriptive study
  6. Identifying additional studies for a systematic review of retention strategies in randomised controlled trials: making contact with trials units and trial methodologists
  7. Methods for obtaining unpublished data
  8. Clinical features of Parkinson’s disease patients are associated with therapeutic misconception and willingness to participate in clinical trials
  9. Health research participants are not receiving research results: a collaborative solution is needed
  10. Health research participants’ preferences for receiving research results
  11. Why is therapeutic misconception so prevalent?
  12. Recommendations for the return of research results to study participants and guardians: a report from the children’s oncology group
  13. Oncology physician and nurse practices and attitudes regarding offering clinical trial results to study participants
  14. Search for unpublished data by systematic reviewers: an audit
  15. Patient and public involvement in data collection for health services research: a descriptive study
  16. Health researchers’ attitudes towards public involvement in health research
  17. Patients’ and clinicians’ research priorities
  18. Public involvement at the design stage of primary health research: a narrative review of case examples
  19. The impact of patient and public involvement on UK NHS health care: a systematic review
  20. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials
  21. No longer research about us without us: a researcher’s reflection on rights and inclusive research in Ireland
  22. Willingness to participate in pragmatic dialysis trials: the importance of physician decisional autonomy and consent approach
  23. How important is patient recruitment in performing clinical trials?
  24. Recruiting hard-to-reach subjects: is it worth the effort?
  25. Fundamental dilemmas of the randomised clinical trial process: results of a survey of the 1,737 Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group investigators
  26. The research-treatment distinction: A problematic approach for determining which activities should have ethical oversight
  27. Leaving therapy to chance
  28. Use of altered informed consent in pragmatic clinical research
  29. A framework for analysis of research risks and benefits to participants in standard of care pragmatic clinical trials
  30. Public engagement on global health challenges
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